Is It Dangerous to Drive on Bridges in Cape May County?

Posted on May 8, 2017 at 12:00pm by

Are the bridges in Cape May County falling apart? According to report in The Press of Atlantic City, they appear to be and lawmakers are struggling to come up with the funding necessary to fix the problem, which could lead to car accidents and pedestrian injuries.

What’s Wrong with the Bridges in Cape May County?

Per the report in The Press of Atlantic City, structural issues involving the bridges in Cape May County have been a problem for a while. Many of the bridges are older, which results in them constantly needing to be repaired.

For instance, Townsends Inlet bridge had to be shut down recently after a large underwater crack was discovered, and last year, the 96th Street bridge was shut down for month due to the same issue. Both bridges are over 75 years old, and according to a county engineer The Press of Atlantic City spoke to, the bridges along with many others will need to be replaced eventually due to structural problems. In fact, per the article, of Cape May County’s 73 bridges, 11 will need to be replaced because they are becoming structurally unsafe.

However, including the $1.6 billion from New Jersey’s Transportation Trust Fund and $260 million that Governor Christie has earmarked to fund state road and bridge projects, Cape May County only receives one million dollars a year for bridge projects and $1.6 million annually for road projects. By comparison, the recent replacement of the Garden State Parkway bridge cost $143 million, and in 2012, it cost $500 million to replace the Route 52 causeway between Ocean City and Somers Point.

Our Cape May and Atlantic City personal injury law firm has been successfully protecting the rights of victims of car, truck, motorcycle, bike and pedestrian accidents in New Jersey for decades, including securing several multimillion dollar recoveries for clients.



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